The world’s first commercial electric plane



The first commercial plane in the world with all electric technology is the six-seater Harbour Air ePlane. It just completed its test flight in Canada.

[caption id="attachment_28169" align="aligncenter" width="1123"]The first collaboration between MagniX and Harbour Air is a success The first collaboration between MagniX and Harbour Air is a success/ Ph: Pexels@Alex Powell[/caption]

The six-seater Harbour Air ePlane was designed by Australian engineering firm MagniX, has become the first commercial electric plane takes flight in Canada.

About the first commercial electric plane flight

On 10 December, the Harbour Air ePlane performed a trial flight which is 15 minutes long in the city of Richmond, south of Vancouver. It was operated by Harbour Air with Harbour Air CEO and founder Greg McDougall are the pilots. When this six-seater, all-electric commercial seaplane completed a test flight in Canada, it marks a "world-first milestone" ever. This first commercial electric plane flight is also a remark of the first collaboration between MagniX and Harbour Air. They aim to create an all-electric commercial seaplane fleet across British Columbia. And with the success of this test flight, this type of aviation is possible in the future, according to the companies. Before retrofitting more aircrafts, the two companies MagniX and Harbour Air will need to focus on the certification process for the propulsion system, also the advancements in batteries in order to reduce them in size.

Many companies apply all-electric aircraft propulsion technology

The Harbour Air ePlane is a six-passenger small aircraft, which has a 750-horsepower (560 kW) high-power-density electric propulsion system developed by MagniX. The technology demonstrates a clean and efficient way to power aeroplanes. It was unveiled in June this year at the Paris Air Show. Also, this latest progression in all-electric flight is part of a drive to fight climate change. There are some other companies such as Boeing, Rolls Royce and Uber currently developing electric vertical takeoff and landing (EVTOL) aircraft for commercial use. Earlier this year, a startup Lilium in Germany revealed its prototype for a five-seater jet-powered electric air taxi which is expected to have the fleet in operation by 2025. Norway also has a plan to replace all of its fuel-guzzling jets with electric planes by 2040 on all domestic flights.

The world’s first commercial electric plane

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